I had forgotten to tell you about the work of Jérôme Zonder.

Jérôme-Zon77x702.jpg
Jérôme Zonder - Jeu d'enfants n°1, 2010 © Jérôme Zonder et Galerie Eva Hober Paris

I discovered the work above at the exhibition Tous Cannibales at La Maison Rouge in Paris. Somehow, the show got lost in the frenzy of my last gallery-marathon in Paris. Plus, taking picture was a big 'no-no-!-get-out-of-here' which means that i couldn't document properly the exhibition. Yesterday, however, i was preparing my trip to Berlin (DMY!) and discovered that Tous Cannibales gets an Alles Kannibalen? reincarnation at me Collectors Room in Berlin. As its name indicates, the exhibition explores anthropophagy in art. Works by Goya and James Ensor are shown in dialogue with pieces by Wim Delvoye, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Pieter Hugo and Jérôme Zonder.

Zonder's work is provocative. Everybody loves provocative nowadays but he plays the provocative and offensive game with more panache and imagination than most. I thought he deserved more than just a photo on this blog:

jeromezonder7.jpg
On fête l'anniversaire de ses neuf ans, 2009

phocadavfile_5411.jpg
Série Un jeu d´enfants, 2009

pfourme_5001.jpg
Au départ c´est plus petit qu´une fourmi, 2007

phoseulle_4900.jpg
On fête l´anniversaire de ses neuf ans..., 2009

jeromezonder2.jpg
On fête l´anniversaire de ses neuf ans..., 2009

Seizing on strong iconographic symbols taken from the Nazi aesthetics and the worlds of childhood and cartoons, Zonder revisits these forms of narration and the innocence they carry (children drawings, clear lines) as well as the cruelty (realism, caricature) through mise-en-scenes with a gory tone where sex and barbarity are more than compatible. (extract from the press release of the exhibition Pupper Show Dust at the Galerie Eva Hober Paris)

jeromezonder18.jpg
Garance et Baptiste sont a la campagne, 2009

photo_file_5350.jpg
Un jeu d´enfants, 2009

Alles Kannibalen? is open until 21st of August 2011 at me Collectors Room in Berlin.

Sponsored by:





A few days ago, i was at La Cantine in Paris to cover and be a member of the jury of the second edition of the ArtGame Wee­kend. Artists, graphic designers, musicians, interaction designers, engineers, VJ's and coders were given 48 hours to develop a game for mobile devices.

5aahhhhfa601753.jpg
Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy

On Fri­day eve­ning, 36 participants - most of them had never met each other - submitted their ideas for a game. They had then 20 minutes to discuss what the 6 most exciting proposals were and built teams around these 6 winning ideas.

5board1091ccdb2.jpg

The remaining hours were dedicated to collaborating on a game that had to be playable, playful, original, suitable for mobile platforms and have some art credentials (although the definition of that particular point was rightly left to their discretion.) Participants were provided with food, sofas, coaches to guide them and a team of hosts.

The 6 teams worked day...

5groupeday342218.jpg

and night

56group0fa4db.jpg

The winner last year was Générations, a game that a sole person will never have the time to finish since it has to be passed on from one generation to another and thus be played over several decades.

I didn't have particularly high expectations before the Sunday presentation. I had heard some interesting ideas on the first night but then i thought "how much can you do over 48 hours?" A lot as we discovered. I had a fantastic time reviewing the projects together with the other members of the jury: designer slash researcher slash developer Damien Djaouti, Sylvain Huguet, co-founder of Dardex-Mort2Faim, and of the fes­ti­val GAMERZ and Fabien Delpiano, founder of Pastagames. Here we are during the public presentation:

5juryb01f2d.jpg
Team presenting the game EXIN. Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy

5bigbroteaefd.jpg
Team presenting the game Big Brother. Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy

5presenta2b031d9ec9.jpg
Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy

After the presentations, we (=the jury) were led together with a great choice of antipasti in a room to play and decide.

0aajurry788.jpg

The game we liked the best was "Gone" and if i tell you that it is simply about death and has the player run for their life until they ineluctably die, you might not find the concept highly exciting. But as developer writes "It really needs to be played to be understood. If I had to sum it up in a sentence I'd say "embrace the calm inevitability of death". The design was impeccable, the sound design was flawless and the game was extremely absorbing. It was an unpretentious game but there was nothing we wanted to change about it. Bravo to Claire Sistach, Romain Bonnin, Caesar Espojo Pham, Fabien Cazenabe, Lionel Jabre, Lise George and William Dyce.

0agonegoneogoenew3.jpg

Another game that deserves a mention asks players to keep a nuclear power plant in their pocket. As its name indicates, Fukushimagotchi was inspired by the Fukushima accident. The nuclear plant quietly grows and thrives inside your pocket but if you climb the stairs too fast, jump or let the phone fall, the nuclear power plant will suffer from the instability it immediately perceives and will start releasing radiations in the environment. The team explained us that they plan to make the game geolocative so that the radiations in Paris will not only be mapped but can also be detected by your device as you go through the city. The team members for the project were Lucas Grolleau, Cedric Liang, Josselin Perrus, Marc Planard, Johan Spielmann, Jet Ung with Cedric Pinson.

Then there was Baby Boom. The team have created a game that simulates a woman giving birth. Very graphic, very politically incorrect.

5accouchenf6fca0b0_z.jpg
Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy

The game Colossus is very promising. Players use their index and medium finger to 'walk' on the screen. Like a Godzilla terrifying a whole city. You can chose to either destroy the buildings and crush people. The city will then rebuild itself slowly after your passage. Or you can decide to spare everyone but your stroll will get more difficult as the game proceeds since you will encounter more and more houses and people to avoid.

56colossgam2b7bdd.jpg
Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy

5outsidea113.jpg
Photo by Simon Bachelier and Brice Roy


5julien32.jpg
Julien Dorra, one of the organizers of the event


56cantine_07ff6d5543.jpg

ArtGame Wee­kend was organized by nod-A, Julien Dorra, One Life Remains and Silicon Sentier.

If you read french, check out Digital Coproductions' coverage of the ArtGame Weekend.
All the images tagged artgameweekend.

One thing that has puzzled me for years is the passion some people profess for the Louis Vuitton monogram. It's not that it's unsightly, it's just that the reason why some girls ruin themselves for the joy of sporting that insipid brown thing on their arm is beyond me. That prejudice against the brand has held me back from visiting the Espace culturel Louis Vuitton each time i was in Paris. I went a couple of times to the Fondation Cartier and to the Fondazione Prada in Milan but i couldn't get past the name of the Espace Culturel. Until last week when i decided that it was only fair to get rid of my narrow-mindedness.

luc_mattenberger_moonrise-nouvelliste.jpg
Luc Mattenberger, Moon rise, 2009

It didn't start so well. I wasn't allowed to take any photo, not even of the artworks i had copiously photographed in other venues. When i asked why i wasn't allowed to take photos i was told "Because it's not allowed." The exhibition itself, however, made much more sense than the answer i had just received. The artworks selected makes you bounce from the poetical to the humorous to the downright dangerous. Plus, the LV cultural center team hands out hard cover catalogues of the show like other distribute b&w copies of press releases.

5general017ea6e08f.jpg
View of the exhibition space

"Somewhere Else" showcases the work of eighteen artists for whom expeditions are the starting point of artistic endeavours.

Some try to relocate their creation in order to define them separately, some work on work installations while some others produce their creations outside of its conventional environment. Such undertakings have, in fact, led to a new artistic movement which is primarily based on encounters with new spaces and other human beings.

The exhibition opens with a work by Bas Jan Ader, a conceptual artist who disappeared at sea in 1975 while working on an art performance titled "In Search of the Miraculous".

0afroidnSearcart2_large.jpg
Joanna Malinowska, In Search of the Miraculous, Continued.../part II of three, 2006

The title of the work that Joanna Malinowska presents in the gallery directly refers to Ader's last performance. In Search of the Miraculous, Continued.../part II is a continuous video shot of a solar-powered boombox playing Glen Gould's recording of Bach's 'Goldberg Variations'. The equipment was abandoned in the Canadian tundra, its sound fading in the wind. Notes of Bach and Gould might be forever audible if the installation survives storm, snow and winds. But this, of course, would be truly miraculous.

SHOmongolieOT2_large.jpg
Fabrice Langlade, Un pont en porcelaine en Mongolie, 2010

Fabrice Langlade was showing the plans and model of a porcelain bridge he hopes to build one day on the steppe of Mongolia.

4_owrreecklarge.jpg
Fernando Prats, Acción Chaitén 17, Sismografía de Chile, 2009

Fernando4_full.jpg
Fernando Prats, Acción Chaitén 11, Sismografía de Chile, 2009

Fernando Prats, who will represent Chile at this year's Venice Art Biennial, celebrates the expressive work of the physical elements. Sometimes he's there to nudge and help natural elements. Other times, such as in Acción Chaitén, he merely records the result of nature's endeavors. Acción Chaitén documents the destruction wrought by the Chilean volcano which, when it erupted in 2008, covered an entire region in ash.

artwork_imarc-horowitz.jpg
Marc Horowitz, National Dinner Tour, 2004-2005

Despite his wide notoriety, i confess that i had never heard of Marc Horowitz before. But did he make me laugh! In 2005, while working on a catalog shoot for Crate and Barrel, he managed to sneak in the words "dinner w/ marc 510-872-7326" on one of the pages of the catalog. The catalog was distributed, he lost his job but received more than 30,000 phone calls. He spent the following year driving across the country and having dinner with individuals he had never met. He documented "The National Dinner Tour" in charming pictures and blog posts.

The Marc Horowitz Signature Series is a set of 19 performances aimed at 'improving' the lives of the citizens he encountered. He planted an "Anonymous Semi-nudist Colony" in Nampa, Idaho, inviting passersby to shed some pieces of clothing and bounce around a park with him. In Craig, Colorado, he enticed people to bury their problems in a park plot. My favourite is the video he shot in Walsenburg, Colorado where he reenacted the techno viking dance session in a junkyard.

0tixador-horizon-20-16_large.jpg
Laurent Tixador & Abraham Poincheval, Horizon moins 20, 2008

For Horizon moins 20, Laurent Tixador & Abraham Poincheval spent 20 days digging an underground tunnel in Murcia, Spain. They advanced one metre a day and sealed it up behind themselves as they went. Like moles.

5vue43_3cc7de4872.jpg
Vue of Laurent Tixador & Abraham Poincheval's project in the exhibition space

56piolet859cd.jpg
Vue of Laurent Tixador & Abraham Poincheval's project in the exhibition space (detail)

Somewhere Else/Ailleurs was curated by Paul Ardenne and remains open at the Espace culturel Louis Vuitton until May 8, 2011.

Other artistic expeditions: Rentyhorn, making the legacy of colonialism visible, The Spice Trade Expedition - In pursuit of artificial flavoring, Biorama 2: the Moon Goose Experiment, Interview with Ulla Taipale from Capsula.

I had never heard of Laurent Montaron before last week. I was preparing a trip to Paris and going through the list of exhibitions open when i stumbled upon a small photo of a Catholic saint and, far more interestingly i should say, a press release that mentioned the artist's interest in the history of media from the appearance of mechanical modes of representation in the late 19th century up to today's different digital forms.

Off i was to see Montaron's solo show at the galerie schleicher+lange. The exhibition is small with only three pieces, each of them strong, perplexing and unlike anything i've seen anywhere else recently.

phoenix1_0.jpg
Laurent Montaron, PHOENIX, 2010, phonograph phénix, wood, waxcylinder with recording of a human voice speaking in tongues, installation view Kunsthaus Baselland

lm_phoenix_b_0_0.jpg
PHOENIX (detail), 2010

Phoenix awaits the visitor right as they step into the gallery. An antique Phénix, a wax-cylinder phonograph launched in 1902 by French mail-order company Maleville, is laying on a wooden stage. Someone has to come and activate the phonograph for you. During a few minutes, the time it takes for the needle to go from one end of the cylinder to the other, one can hear the voice of a person speaking in tongues. No sense can be made of what is said in the recording.

5instru_9d71a2fa28.jpg
PHOENIX (detail), 2010

When he patented the phonograph in 1877, Thomas A. Edison -who ironically was suffering from increasing deafness- wasn't thinking about musical recordings. He saw the invention as an instrument that would provide a kind of immortality by preserving the human voice well after the person had died. It was a 'machine to record the last words of the dying'.

"My intention," the artist has said in an interview with curator Daniel Baumann, "was not only to transform these questions about the advent of the media into images -- although I do believe that to some extent the questions are being asked in the same way today as they were a hundred years ago -- but also to make the experience of death part of the work. As in a number of my other works, the physical medium is wearing out as we listen and we're witnessing the death of the sound. In a way the viewer remains the sole repository of the memory of the work."

g_SL11Montaron01.jpg
Lent portrait de Sainte Bernadette, 2010

2LM_STEBERNADETTE_large.jpg
Lent portrait de Sainte Bernadette, 2010

The second work in the exhibition, Lent portrait de Sainte Bernadette ("Slow Portrait of St Bernadette", 2011), is a slow-motion 16 mm film loop with the camera moving across the face of the saint.

Bernadette Soubirous was a miller's daughter who made the fortune of a small market town in the SW of France. In 1858, she reported apparitions of "a small young lady" and required that a chapel was built at the site of her visions. The Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes is now a major place of Roman Catholic pilgrimage. It is said that after her death, Bernadette's body has shown no signs of decomposition.

lm_minoltaplanetariumms15_a_0_0.jpg
Minolta Planetarium MS-15, 2011

The worked i found most amazing is Minolta Planetarium MS-15, a large-format photograph taken inside the planetarium in Memphis, in the United States. All one can see at first is a starry sky. After a while, the eye wanders and realizes that, in the foreground, there is the dark silhouette of the machine that projects the images of the stars inside the Planetarium.

These works subtly remind us that while technology has provided us with new means of perceiving and representing reality it has not necessarily brought us closer from 'the truth' for it has also given rise to new ways for questioning reality.

Laurent Montaron's work homes in on the paradoxes attendant on our awareness of modernity, and simultaneously on the tools that shape our representations, revealing the sometimes irrational element of belief involved.

The exhibition closes tomorrow. Make haste and visit the galerie schleicher+lange if you're in Paris this weekend.

Quick overview of a couple of photo exhibitions i saw in Paris over the weekend:

Distress, Stéphane Duroy's photo exhibition at the gallery in camera, the most moving show i've seen in Paris closed on Saturday alas!

The French photographer documented -mostly in black and white- the cityscape and society of England at the time of Thatcherism.

mechiiipsress-jpg.jpg
Bradford, 1981

mecoiffeurstress-jpg.jpg
Newbiggin-bye-the-Sea, England, 1992

1992?!

meHovis8ss-jpg.jpg
London East End, 1983

3 Liverpool, Angleterre 1983.jpg
Stéphane Duroy, Liverpool, England, 1983

meaubar5ess-jpg.jpg
Dublin, 1980

meinterieur5ss-jpg.jpg
London East End, 1983

God i love this guy's work!

med_17-distress-jpg.jpg
Liverpool, 1983

More images at La lettre de la photographie.

In January, Martin Parr was invited by the Institut des Cultures d'Islam to spend 4 days snapping his way through the Goutte-d'Or, a neighbourhood in Paris known as "Little Africa" because of the large numbers of African and Arab residents living there.

ICI_MP_catalogue_Page_04.jpg
Eric, charcutier au 'Cochon d'Or'

The show opened as a controversial debate on "laïcité" -or secularism- was taking place at the parliament, and a week before the law banning full face veils in public places was implemented in the country. Véronique Rieffel, the director of the institute, commented on Parr's work in the neighbourhood: "It throws a light on them that is different from usual. For once one speaks well of them, with tenderness, with empathy; it was important for us that they saw the photos before everybody else, so that they were not surprised, so that they appropriated their image rather than the usually stolen images."

Achien1 MAIN ART.jpg
Dog reception, in a hotel of the neighbourhood, 2011

56view8f9bae31.jpg
View of the exhibition space

There are only 2 mosques in La Goutte d'Or. On Friday, so many followers of Islam turn up for prayer that they have to install their little prayer mats outside of the places of worship. The streets have thus to be kept clear of car traffic for one hour every Friday.

0parprierer2.jpg
Prayer rue Polonceau, a Friday, 2011

0ICI_exotiques024x724.jpg
Praying Muslims, exotic products?

The Goutte d'Or! is at the Institut des Cultures d'Islam, Paris, until July 2, 2011.

Far away from the Goutte d'Or neighbourhood, the Galerie Frank Elbaz shows life on the road with train-hoppers, hitchhikers, wilderness squatters, wayfarers, and drifters. Jane Kurland spent nine month on the road with her son following the nomadic subcultures of America.

JKU-Spare Some Gas- 2010-76.2x101.6.jpg
Spare some Gaz, 2010

JKU-Lava Beds National Monument-2010-61x76.2.jpg
Lava Beds National Monuments, 2010

JKU-Nova SS-2011-76.2x101.6.jpg
Nova SS, 2011

Justine Kurland, "He sleeps where He Falls" remains open until May 4, 2011 at the Galerie Frank Elbaz in Paris.

Related stories: Parrworld. The Collection of Martin Parr (Part 1), Parrworld. The Collection of Martin Parr (Part 2), England My England.

First stop in Paris this afternoon was for Miss Van solo exhibition at the Magda Danysz Gallery.

Twiscepter6bd.jpg
Twinkles 6 (Monkey and scepter), 2010

The usual doll-like girls with their impenetrable look, porcelain skin, and pursed lips. They still like to be surrounded by animals and don't embarrass themselves with clothing. Miss Van's new series Twinkles, however, is slightly different from the graffiti she used to paint in the streets of Europe. This one is much darker and seems to acknowledge the work of classical painters.

Twihibou_0.jpg
Twinkles 4 (Hiboux), 2010

Mascaras8bd.jpg
Mascaras 8, 2010

Mascaras9bd.jpg
Mascaras 9, 2010

Twietetass8bd.jpg
Twinkles 8 (Tetas animals), 2010

Tvautour9bd.jpg
Twinkles 9 (Vautour), 2010

missvan7_62x82_HD.jpg
Lovestain 7, 2009

mismagic18_BD.jpg
Still A Little Magic 1, 2008

There's nothing i'd like to add really. Except that you have only a few days left to check out the show.

Twinkles is open until 30 April, 2011 at the Magda Danysz Gallery in Paris.

 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7 
sponsored by: