As i blogged a few days ago, Art 13, London's new contemporary art fair, brought many (good) surprises and new names on the radar of collectors and plebeians.

In order NOT to illustrate my point, i'll start this quick overview of the photo works presented at the fair with a series by one of the most famous YBAs.

Mat Collishaw's Last Meals on Death Row is a splendid and sinister collection of still lifes recreating the final meals of death-sentence prisoners in American prisons.

Collishaw's compositions portray the request of inmates from Texas, the state with the highest number of executions since 1976. In 2011 however, Texas banned last meal requests for prisoners on death row after Lawrence Russell Brewer ordered two chicken fried steaks, a triple-meat bacon cheeseburger, fried okra, a pound of barbecue, three fajitas, a meat lover's pizza, a pint of ice cream and a slab of peanut butter fudge. But didn't eat any of it.

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Last Meal on Death Row - Gary Gilmore, 2012

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Last Meal on Death Row - Velma Barfield, 2012.

For more art takes on the same theme, check out the post The Last Meals of the Executed: A Selection of Projects in Photography and Painting.

I've been particularly impressed by Lamberto Teotino's minimal interventions on archive photographs.

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Lamberto Teotino, Sistema di riferimento monodimensionale, 2011

More gems along the way:

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Back Seung-Woo, Untitled, from the series: "Blow Up", 2001. At Gana Art Gallery

Back to celebrated photographers with Roger Ballen:

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Roger Ballen, Man holding Cat, 1995. At Kleinschmidt Fine Photographs

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Roger Ballen, Head Below Wires, 2000. At Kleinschmidt Fine Photographs

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Paul Almasy, Dockyard in Sakai, Osaka, 1973. At Kleinschmidt Fine Photographs

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Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou, Untitled (Vodou Series), 2011. At Jack Bell Gallery

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Leonce Raphael Agbodjélou, Untitled (Musclemen series), 2012

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Minoru HirataHi Red Center's Dropping Event at Ikenobo Hall ( (Performance at the rooftop of Ikenobo Flower School's Headquarters in Tokyo), Tokyo, October 10, 1964 1964, printed 2011

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Stephen Danzig, Regeneration God, 2012

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Chu Teppa Koy, Goddess of the Winter, the insight and the Hugs, 2012. At Diana Lowenstein Gallery

Previously: Art13, the art fair that took us by surprise.

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The facade of the Little Black Gallery in Chelsea is indeed painted in black, the interior is not that small and right now they have a stunning show that bears a slightly unnerving title: The Silence of Dogs in Cars. Martin Usborne portrays dogs locked inside cars. Some look peaceful and lost in their own thoughts, others are barking. Or sleeping.

When he started the series, the photographer walked around car parks looking for dogs left inside cars but his quest wasn't too successful so he decided to entirely orchestrate each photo, stopping people who were having a stroll with their dogs, matching each animal with a car and location. As Usborne explained to Max Houghton: I did start it as a reportage project but after I found myself walking around supermarket carparks making barking noises to try and awaken sleeping dogs that were not actually there, I set up the shots. But I now realise that is the right thing. It's very important that it's lit and looks cinematic, dreamlike almost.

I never thought i'd write a post dedicated to dogs photos one day but these were irresistible:

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Dasher

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Flo

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Maus

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Behind the scenes. Image


Bones

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Bones

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Peggy

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Peggy 2

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Hector 2

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Milo

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Prospero

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Chara

The Silence of Dogs in Cars is at The Little Black Gallery until 27 April 2013.

You'd think that this town wasn't big enough for another contemporary art fair. London has Frieze of course but also the London Art Fair, The Other Art Fair, the Affordable Art Fair, Kinetica, and i'm sure i'm forgetting others along the way.

But Art13 London, which took place a few weekends ago inside the stunning Olympia Grand Hall, demonstrated, if need be, that not all art fairs are created equal and that you can bring something different if you have enough taste and a clear vision.

Stephanie Dieckvoss, the fair director, gave the event the mission to bring to the city galleries and artists we haven't seen much of here in Europe. Of course, all fairs claim to be 'truly international' but most of the time 'around the world' means Europe and the U.S.. Art13, however, sourced galleries and artists from Asia, the Middle East and Africa as well as the West. I can't remember having discovered so many artists in such a short period of time.

Quick selection of the goods on show:

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Aram Bartholl, Offline Monochrome (triptych), 2013. Photo DAM GALLERY

Aram Bartholl had a cunning and unassuming set of wifi routers at the booth of the DAM Gallery (Berlin/Frankfurt.) Each router is associated to a specific digital art work. The work is online and you can view it on your own smartphone. Connect to the network associated to the router and the work appears in your browser. If you want to see the second work, you have to repeat the operation and connect to the second router, etc. The pieces are available to everyone to enjoy online but they are disconnected from the Internet.

That work is pure Bartholl: simple and brilliant.

The other images don't require much explanation:

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Nyoman Masriadi, Godlike, 2013. At Gajah Gallery. Photo: Heru Wibowo/Gajah Gallery via Bloomberg

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Nyoman Masriadi, Godlike (detail), 2013. At Gajah Gallery

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Charming Baker, Love's Revolution

I spotted lots and lots of 'plush toy art':

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Rostan Tavasiev, Antique, 2005. At Anna Nova Art Gallery

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Oliver Bragg, Yeti, 2012. At Galerie E.G.P.

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At Rebecca Hossack Gallery

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Maria Bogoraz, DOGS project, N 7-9, 2012

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Sui Jianguo, Made in China, 2007. (UCCA Limited Edition)

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Donghyun Son, Godzilla, 2010. At Aando Fine Art

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Donghyun Son, Godzilla (detail), 2010. At Aando Fine Art

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Konstantin Bessmertny, Terrorist Savinkov, 2013. At Amelia Johnson Contemporary

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Konstantin Bessmertny, 1881, 2013. At Amelia Johnson Contemporary

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Ryu HoYeol, Baum, 2011. At Amelia Johnson Contemporary

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Donghyun Son, Mask 008 - Hannibal Lecter's Mask, 2011 and Mask 035 Hit Girl, 2011. At Aando Fine Art

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Lee So Yeun, Chameleon, 2012. At Cais Gallery

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Jury Alexandrov. At Anna Nova Gallery

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Zilvinas Kempinas, Fountain, 2011

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Gideon Kiefer, Spherical Drawing #001 - #002 (Diorama For A Lost Reality)

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Eric Chan, Hitchcock's Love Affair with Abstract, 2013

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Peter Blake, Circus Collage (Working Proof), 2013

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Eduardo Arroyo, Melencolia - Mickey, 2003. At LEVY gallery

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Dawn Black, Conceal Project. At Cynthia Reeves

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Dawn Black, Conceal Project. At Cynthia Reeves

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Julius Von Bismarck. At Alexander Levy

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Peter Clark, Big in Yellow (detail), 2012. At Rebecca Hossack Gallery

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Alice Anderson, Travelling Factory performance

Lazarides's booth was painted to look like a squat. Apparently, the gallery sold Banksy's 'Guantanamo Bay', in the artist's frame, for £375,000.

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The booth of Lazarides, London, U.K. with a Banksy above the fireplace. Photo © Coline Milliard

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A 12m-long cylinder of rice paper and bamboo:

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Zhu Jinshi's, Boat. Photo from Wallpaper

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Zhu Jinshi's, Boat

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Belated and speedy report on the 5th Kinetica Art Fair.

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Aphra Shemza, Composition X. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

Year after year, i go to Kinetica with enthusiasm. I might find it a challenge to spot the real gems in a sea of (sometimes) artistically questionable works but that's part of the fun. Kinetica might not be the Mecca for art & science that some bloggers and journalists describe (too many holograms!) but it's certainly a good place to discover kinetic, electronic, and robotic art. It also has a friendly, open atmosphere that makes it surprisingly easy to have a chat with artists, art dealers and other exhibitors.

This year, the theme of Kinetica's exhibition and programme of talks and performances was 'Illusion and Reality' and the thin veil that divides what is real and perceived. The -fairly broad- theme aims to challenge ideas on what is real, perceived or imagined, and focuses on transformation, metamorphism, visual paradox, vibration, nature, the subliminal and the subconscious.

This year, i liked:

Wu Xiao Fei Dyson's Musical Typewriter sits quietly on a table. Each of its letters is attached to a fishing line that disappears quickly in a confusion of other fishing lines and triggers a little hammer as you type. The hammers strike empty barrels of rapeseed cooking oil, jars of Marmite, cans of Pepsi, wine bottles, etc. Each producing a different sound.

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Wu Xiao Fei Dyson, Musical Typewriter. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Wu Xiao Fei Dyson, Musical Typewriter. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Wu Xiao Fei Dyson, Musical Typewriter. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica


Wu Xiao Fei Dyson, Musical Typewriter

Mechanical Flipbooks by Mark Rosen and Wendy Marvel, (based on the motion studies of Eadweard Muybridge) are inspired by Eadweard Muybridge's pioneering photographic studies of motion.

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Mark Rosen and Wendy Marvel, Mechanical Flipbook. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

Mechanical Flipbook, Horse in Motion

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Mechanical Flipbook, Horse in Motion. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Mark Rosen and Wendy Marvel, Mechanical Flipbook. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

Right at the entrance of the fair, The Walk was impossible to miss. The 2.5-meter diameter sphere is covered with some 35,000 LED's displaying a video loop that tells a story loosely based on Dante's Divine Comedy of the journey from Hell to Purgatory.

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Titia Ex, The Walk. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Titia Ex, The Walk. Image Happy Famous Artists

The most exciting booth was by far the one set up by All Visual Arts. They showed six works inside a small dark room.

The level of water contained in Ben Tyers' Breathe glass sculpture goes up and down following a slow, regular rhythm. In fact, the mechanism 'inhales and exhales' the same capacity of air as two human lungs. There's something meditative about the piece as after having watched it for a short period of time, you realize that your own breathing pattern calms down.

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Ben Tyers, Breathe, 2009. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

Paul Fryer's Chess for Tesla (which some of you might have seen at The Art of Chess exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery) is an homage to Nikola Tesla. Because Tesla was a pioneer of the vacuum tubes, the 32 pieces in the set are glass vacuum tubes. I didn't dare touch the work but apparently The board of the chess set powers the vacuum tube pieces so that when unplugged the individual pieces glow for a little while, struggling to keep connection with the board, and then die. Plug them back in and they reactivate.

I was told that the chess board was about to travel to Hollywood to feature in a blockbuster scifi movie (Star Trek if i remember correctly.)

More images, including Kinetic LEGO sculpture by Alex Allmont and a kinetic-tensegrity-roof and reactive floor.

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Alex Allmont. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Alex Allmont. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica


Alex Allmont, All Work and No Play. At Kinetica 2013


Alex Allmont, Ride With Me

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Alex Allmont. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images


David John Rosewell, Puppets to our Creation

David John Rosewell's Puppets to our Creation mirrors the movements of the viewer who stands in front of it. The person becomes thus both the puppet and the puppeteer.

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Sharisharishari + Takumi, Tea Ceremony Room. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Christiaan Zwanikken, Exoskeletal. Picture: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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Alexei Shulgin, Rotating Landscapes. Image Happy Famous Artists

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Piotr Jedrzejewski. Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

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Photo by Luke Neve for Kinetica

More images on Happy Famous Artists and on my flickr set. The Torygraph has a stunning gallery.

Previously: The Kinetica Art Fair (part 1), The Kinetica Art Fair (part 2) and Soundwaves.

The other day i received the code to download the photos of the photographers shortlisted for the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition. Idle and bored, i opened the files and thought i should share the images. Because that's the kind of thing you do when you're an idle and bored blogger but also because the photos are as stunning as ever.

As usual in this kind of international photo competition, there's a couple of winning shots about Palestine, some portraits of magnificently coiffed people, plenty of violent deaths, prisoners living in dire conditions and almost half of these talented photographers are Italian. I'm very impressed by the Afrometals series, btw.

Most of these images will be exhibited next month at Somerset House in London in April and i'll take the opportunity to highlight the fact that for the first time in 5 years, i'm actually writing about an exhibition before it has closed.

Here's a quick selection with texts copied/pasted from the txt file accompanying each images.

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Agurtxane Concellon. From the series: Røros, a journey. Copyright: ©Agurtxane Concellon, Spain, Shortlist, Travel, Professional Competition, 2013

A group of 20-30 men and women with 12 horses and sleighs will travel during three days, crossing snowed roads and iced lakes, to reach to reach the opening day of Røros winter fair in Norway.

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Alecsandra Dragoi, New Year's eve traditions in Romania. Copyright: ©Alecsandra Dragoi, Romania, Winner, Culture, Youth Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Daniele Tamagni, Edith, Hellrider, Dadmonster. From the series Afrometals. Copyright: © Daniele Tamagni, Italy, Shortlist, Art & Culture, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Daniele Tamagni, A fan of metal music performing on at Kanye village. From the Series: Afrometals. Copyright: © Daniele Tamagni, Italy, Shortlist, Art & Culture, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

In Botswana metal music has landed in the nineties, but the rock came in the seventies by two Italian brothers, Ivo and Renato Sbrana, born and raised in the heart of Africa. The metal complexes are performing in nightclubs, concerts, festivals. The most famous African rock band is now Skinflint.The ranks of their fans has expanded dramatically. These fans wear jackets and black leather pants, studded belts, boots and cowboy hats. On their t-shirts stand out skulls, obscenities, historical covers of hard-rock groups popular in the seventies and eighties of the last century such as Iron Maiden, Metallica, AC / DC. Basically they created their own style look that is inspired by the classic symbolism metal, but also borrows heavily from the iconography of hands-Western film and the traditional rural world of Botswana (ever-present horns of animals concealed beneath the leather jacket ).

Tamagni is also the author of the equally amazing Gentlemen of Bacongo.

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Oliver Weiken, Palestinian morticians prepare the body of a man who died during an Israeli airstrike for his funeral in a morgue in a hospital in the Jabalya refugee camp, north of Gaza City, 21 November 2012. From the series: Israel - Gaza War. Copyright: © Oliver Weiken, Germany, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Oliver Weiken, From the series: Israel - Gaza War. Copyright: ©Oliver Weiken, Germany, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2013

On 14 November 2012 Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) launched a seven day operation in the Hamas controlled Gaza Strip, dubbed 'Operation Pillar of Defense'. The Palestinian Centre for Human Rights said that 158 Palestinians were killed during the operation, of which: 102 were civilians.

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Paolo Pellegrin, From the series The Crescent, Rochester, USA, 2012. ©Paolo Pellegrin/Magnum Photos. For Postcards from America project and ZEIT Magazine, Italy, Finalist, Current Affairs, Professional Competiiton 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

The area of Rochester where these pictures have been taken is part of the so called 'Crescent', a moon shaped area that runs across several Rochester neighborhoods and where crime rates are significantly higher than the rest of the city. The Crescent is home to 27 percent of the city's residents and 80 percent of the city's homicides. The reasons behind the burst of violence include the lagging upstate economy, a steady migration of residents to the suburbs and a growing number of abandoned houses prone to become centers of drug sales and use. Rochester also has a school system that performs poorly. People inside the Crescent experience those problems in greater concentration. ''It's an area of great poverty and high consumption rate of drugs which fuels an incredibly high number of homicides,'' said the Rochester police chief. Rochester, NY. USA 2012

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Javier Arcenillas. From the Series: Red Note. Copyright: © Javier Arcenillas, Spain, Shortlist, Contemporary Issues, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Javier Arcenillas. From the Series: Red Note. Copyright: © Javier Arcenillas, Spain, Shortlist, Contemporary Issues, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

Honduras is considered one of the most violent countries in the world. Every day in the streets of cities like San Pedro Sula or Tegucigalpa capital murder, robbery and violence are increasingly present. Ineffective internal politics of a country as unstable where drug trafficking into the USA is uncontrollable and unsafe neighborhoods of Maras is the closest thing to a daily war.

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Daesung Lee. From the series: On the shore of a vanishing island. Copyright: ©Daesung Lee, Korea, Finalist, Contemporary Issues, Professional Competition 2013/SIPA Press

Ghoramara island is located on a delta region in West Bengal. Due to the dramatic increase in sea level, resulting from the effects global warming since the 1960s, the shores of this island are being perpetually washed away. Since the 1980s more than 50% of the territory has vanished due to erosion by the sea. Many of the people still living on the island are farmers and fishermen who depend on the islandís resources for their livelihoods. According to a civil servant I met, in 20-25 years the Indian government could abolish the island and has already formulated a plan to evacuate villagers to another island named Sagar. However, this evacuation plan does not ensure any financial support or compensation for those having to relocate their lives. I situated villagers on the shore and took portraits of them in juxtaposition with the beauty of the vanishing island. There will come a day when these people will have no choice but to move out of their homeland.

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Valerio Bispuri, Prison inmates Santiago, Chile. From the Series: Encerrados. Copyright: © Valerio Bispuri, Italy, finalist Contemporary Issues Professional Competition 2013 Sony

I spent 10 years travelling for South-America jails. A different and complex world in which violence and abuse are part of convicts life. I saw how the convicts try to find a space similar to that one they had outside jails. They try to preserve their dignity. The necessity to recreate their space is the only way to defend them. They hardly try to maintain their habits in a human boundary condition and overcrowding status. Violence and power management inside the jails are direct consequences of these conditions. I went around for 74 male and female jails in Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Brazil, Colombia e Venezuela. I got in contact with prisoners and guards, with fear and anger, with hope and diffidence. Some convicts considered me a distraction, others looked at me with envy, others again with contempt because they thought that I was there only for taking pictures to sell of their confined life.

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Maxim Donyuk, Natalie, 37 years old. Diagnosis: MDR TB + HIV. From the Series: Tuberculosis in the Faces. Copyright: © Maxim Dondyuk, Ukraine, Shortlist, Portraiture, Professional Competition, 2013

Tuberculosis department of Kherson, August 4, 2011. "I had a great loving family. I was my daddy's little girl. At 42 years old, my father went for a swim and died. My younger sister was going to college, and we needed money to pay for that. The economy was bad at the time, no one was getting paid. That's how I got into drugs." To provide for her family and pay for sister's education, Natalie gave up her music education and started selling drugs instead. Over time, she began to take drugs herself. That's how she contracted HIV, and later - tuberculosis. Natalie died in August 16, 2011. Her sister got married, gave birth to a daughter, and now lives in Moscow.

Series Description: In 1995, the World Health Organization declared the tuberculosis epidemic in Ukraine. Over the past 16 years, the situation has deteriorated even further. Each day TB takes lives of 30 people, annually of about 10,000 people.

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Colin Delfosse, Kamara Serbungo, 17, fled Rubabe (Rutshuru territory) when the M23 soldiers entered the house of his family to forcibly enlist him. Refugee in the Kanyaruchinya camp, he fled a second time when the M23 took over Goma. With other displaced persons he's now taking shelter at the Don Bosco parish. Colin Delfosse, Belgium/2013 Sony World Photography Awards, category Current Affairs

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Andrew Lubimov, Reportage about children military-patriotic camp, located in Crimea (Ukraine). From the series: From the cradle to combat. Copyright: © Andrew Lubimov, Ukraine, Shortlist, Current Affairs, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

The pupil of Cossack's children military-patriotic camp "Crimea-Sech" eats buckwheat cereal at a separate table, during a lunch break in camp, Thursday, August 02, 2012, the Crimea (Ukraine). The main rations of pupils are the cereals and flour's products, tinned stewed meat. Children make breakfast, dinner and supper for themselves.

"Crimea-Sech" accept the children and teenagers between the ages of 8-18 years coming from different regions of CIS countries (Ukraine, Russia, Belarus). These children are cadets and already valid Cossacks of the various Cossacks organizations. Every day pupils of the camp are involved in dissimilar occupations -weapon assembly and disassembly, tactic combat simulation, survival in extreme conditions, reconnaissance work, terrain orientation, hand-to-hand fight, firing from different types of firearms.

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Reinis Hofmanis. From the series: Territory. Copyright: ©Reinis Hofmanis, Latvia, Shortlist, Architecture, Professional Competition, 2013

Territory is focused on various aspects and boundaries in the urban landscape. There are boundaries in landscapes which exist between the public and the private space, there are specifics of vision and perception, and an urban landscape serves as evidence of the way in which people populate and move around in territories. Each image features a guard and his guardhouse. Guard booths are architecturally inexpressive and humble, although present in the urban landscape. Those are images that feature the moment at which the guard has spotted or is approaching the photographer.

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Zhang Kechun, Holding Mao's picture swim across Yellow River in Henan, 2012. From the series: The Yellow River. Copyright: © Zhang Kechun, China, Shortlist, Landscape, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Louise Porter, Kara Woman, Omo Valley, Ethiopia. Copyright: © Louise Porter, USA, Shortlist, People, Open Competition 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Fausto Podavini. From the series: Mirella. Copyright: ©Fausto Podavini, Italy, Finalist, Lifestyle, Professional Competition, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Jens Juul. From the series Six degrees of Copenhagen. Copyright: ©Jens Juul, Denmark, Finalist, Portraiture, Professional, 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

Taking its point of departure in the idea that every person on Earth is connected in the sixth degree, this series of photos depicts human connections through the city of Copenhagen. The set up is that Jens Juul portray random people that he engage with in the streets, and that these chance meetings end up with him taking highly personal photos of these people, who then each send Jens Juul on to another person in their network, who he can portray, who then gives me the name of another person...

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Danny Cohen, Polar Bear. Copyright: ©Danny Cohen, Australia, Shortlist, Enhanced, Open Competition 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Arjen Schmitz. From the series Hong Kong. Copyright: © Arjen Schmitz, Netherlands Finalist, Landscape, Professional Competition 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

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Peter Mysticdidge Plorin, Of the Tiger and Turtle. Copyright: ©Peter Mysticdidge Plorin, Germany, Shortlist, Architecture, Open 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

"Of the Tiger and Turtle" is a work of art on an industrial landmark. In the background you can see a steel mill.

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Diko Risanto, Jaranan (Pentulan). Copyright: © Diko Risanto, Indonesia, Shortlist, Portraits, Youth 2013 Sony World Photography Awards

Image Description: Jaranan is one of traditional culture in Indonesia, this dance usually play with trance by ghost. It looks unusual because jaranan usually has played by adult . this boy playing as pentulan.

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Mehmet Karaca, Makro Dunyasi. Copyright: © Mehmet Karaca, Turkey, Shortlist, Nature & Wildlife, Professional Competition, 2013

The Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition will open at Somerset House, London, on Friday 26 April, the day after the winners of the 2013 Sony World Photography Awards.

The programme of Project Space, the quiet gallery by the side entrance of Tate Modern, almost in front of the gadget shop, is often bolder, brainier and more socially-engaged than Tate's more blockbuster offerings (the Lichtenstein retrospective is a joy, btw.) Project Space is now showing Ruins in Reverse, a small-ish exhibition that takes its title from a a paragraph from an essay that land artist Robert Smithson wrote in 1967 while he was visiting industrial ruins in New Jersey: That zero panorama seemed to contain ruins in reverse, that is -all the new construction that would eventually be built. This is the opposite of the 'romantic ruin' because the buildings don't fall into ruin after they are built but rather rise into ruin before they are built. This anti-romantic mise-en-scène suggests the discredited idea of time and many other 'out of date' things. (...)'

Six artists were invited to show existing or specially commissioned work that consider the -sometimes fictitious- relationship between historical monuments and urban ruins.

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Rä di Martino, No More Stars (Star Wars), 2010. © the artist and Monitor, Rome

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Rä di Martino, No More Stars (Star Wars), 2010. © the artist and Monitor, Rome

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Rä di Martino, No More Stars (Star Wars) 33°59'39 N 7°50'34 E Chot El-Gharsa, Tunisia 03 September 2010. © the artist and Monitor, Rome

No More Stars (Star Wars) is perhaps the series that most clearly embodies the idea behind the show. Rä di Martino photographed the quietly decaying Star Wars movie sets in the deserts of Tunisia, which now look like an undusted archaeological site. I like the fact that her photos intrigue and attract the eye even if at first, you have no idea that they show the dissolving remains of a cult sc-ifi movie.

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Pablo Hare, Monuments 2005-12. Giganotosaurus, Valle de Majes, Arequipa, 2006. © Pablo Hare

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Pablo Hare, Monuments, 2005-2012. Miguel Grau, Bahía Tortugas, Ancash, 2008. © Pablo Hare

Pablo Hare's Monuments series documents the proliferation of public statuary on public squares and in the landscape of the young Republic of Peru. These dolphins, dinosaurs, Ancient Greece-style statues and other sculptures are sad rather than majestic and are often at odds with the spirit of a place they are supposed to epitomize.

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Eliana Otta, Archaeology as Fiction and Materiality as Fiction, 2010. © Eliana Otta

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Eliana Otta, Archaeology as Fiction and Materiality as Fiction, 2010. © Eliana Otta

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Eliana Otta, Archaeology as Fiction and Materiality as Fiction, 2010. © Eliana Otta

Eliana Otta's Archaeology as Fiction surveys and maps the decline of Lima's (analogical) record industry since its 1960s and 70s heyday, and the concurrent construction boom taking place in Lima.

The artist wrote down the addresses she could find printed on the records she owns and hunted for their location in the city. Most have disappeared and the buildings are either crumbling or have been replaced by offices of the Opus Dei.

The installation at Tate shows cassettes, photos, CDs, vinyls, lyrics written by hands or printed, etc. Each artefact has a material relationship to music and to an era that might now look like fiction to people who grew up with digital culture.

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Haroon Mirza, Cross section of a revolution, 2011. © Haroon Mirza

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Haroon Mirza, Cross section of a revolution, 2011. © Haroon Mirza

Haroon Mirza's sound installation Cross Section of a Revolution combines turntables, radio set and computer keyboards, fragments of technological obsolescence that form part of our domestic archaeology, with intangible fragments of the fast-paced Internet era. A TV monitor is repurposed to deliver a YouTube clip of a public speaking competition in Lahore. The turntable assemblage emits a repetitive electronic sound. It sounds like cacophony, i've no clue what the guy on the screen is talking about but the result is rather engrossing.

This way for the video.

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Amalia Pica, On Education, 2008. © Courtesy Herald St, London and Diana Stigter, Amsterdam

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Amalia Pica, On Education, 2008. © Courtesy Herald St, London and Diana Stigter, Amsterdam

Other works include Amalia Pica's video On Education showing a man painting an equestrian statue and a commission by José Carlos Martinat which explores the idea of the neglected urban ruin. The artist hung resin skins peeled from Lima's city walls by the windows of Tate Modern. They show ads and graffiti and they assume a whole new meaning when hanging inside the museum space.

Center for the Aesthetic Revolution has more photos and info.

Project Space: Ruins in Reverse is curated by Flavia Frigeri at Tate Modern and Sharon Lerner Museo de Arte de Lima. The exhibition is at Tate Modern, Project Space, Level 1 until 24 June 2013.

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