The Age of Collage. Contemporary Collage in Modern Art. Edited by Dennis Busch, Robert Klanten, Hendrik Hellige. Preface by Silke Krohn.

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Available on amazon USA and UK.

Publisher Gestalten writes: The Age of Collage is a striking documentation of today's continued appetite for destructive construction. Showcasing outstanding current artwork and artists, the book also takes an insightful behind-the-scenes look at those working with this interdisciplinary and cross-media approach.

The collages featured in this book are influenced by illustration, painting, and photography and play with elements of abstraction, constructivism, surrealism, and dada. Referencing scientific images, pop culture, and erotica, they reflect humanity's collective visual memory and context.

Through confident cuts, brushstrokes, mouse clicks, or pasting, the work in The Age of Collage gives the impossible a tangible form. It expands the possibilities of the genre while turning our worldview on its head along the way.

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Nils Karsten

A book with Yul Brynner on the cover was always going to get my attention.

The Age of Collage adopts the model that made the success of Gestalten books. Plenty of efficient images and a few comments about each of the 80 artists whose work is presented. The intro is more informative than usual (or maybe that's just because i know so little about collages), it says a few words about the strategies of collage, its history and even more interestingly about its presence in contemporary culture from the Beastie Boys' video Sabotage to sampling or mood boards of ads agencies (or even Pinterest i would add.)

And because this book is a visual joy from cover to page 285, i'm going to leave you here with a few discoveries i made while flipping through it:

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Jorge Chamorro, Handmade collages for Poisson Soluble, 2013

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Jorge Chamorro, Pair, 2013

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Beni Bischof

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Brian Vu, Outer Limits, 2011

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Valero Doval, Arlequin Series, 2009-2011

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Valero Doval, Monkey Twins

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Valero Doval, Circus dog I

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Linder Sterling, Oh Grateful Colours, Bright Looks, 2009

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Sarah Eisenlohr

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Nils Karsten

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Dominic McGill, The Splitting of Reality in Two Parts is a Considerable Event, 2009

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Nicholas Lockyer, Leave me no choice but to plot my revenge, 2012


Views inside the book:

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Jeremy Deller: Social Surrealism, by Brigade Commerz, Audio Arts Archives.

(available on amazon UK and USA.)

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Publisher Verlag für moderne Kunst writes: In 2004 Jeremy Deller was awarded the Turner Prize for his multimedia installation 'Memory Bucket'. His signature work 'The Battle of orgreave' (2001) focuses on a critical moment of the international trade union movement, inviting us to a subtly differentiated examination of history. It forms only one part of a growing catalogue of projects that can be read as an ongoing processional body of work which examines, reflects upon and influences our society. Since his 'Manchester Procession' Deller uses the Term 'Social Surrealism' to describe his practise: 'It's going back to the original idea of carnival and procession, which is about inverting reality and changing reality if only for a day or a week and changing how you look at the world.'

Verlag für moderne Kunst has launched a collection of art audio CDs. I'm coveting the Jake and Dinos Chapman, the David Lynch one and crying my eyes out because the Jonathan Meese is in german only (although i did enjoy listening to the audio snippet in which he talks about stuff that are metabolisch and pornografisch.)

The one i had to get right here right now is the audio CD of conversation excerpts with Jeremy Deller. This is basically an audio book with extracts of conversations with Jeremy Deller and it is charming and fascinating. He has a good voice, a clear accent. He is passionate, at times provocative and he sounds like a fun guy to be around.

The files are fairly short, from 1 to 6 minutes. Each one is dedicated to a theme (political art, glam rock) or a particular work. The information and anecdotes come fast: organizing a procession of blind people with blind dogs that refuse to walk on the road, showing folk archives inside a museum and being misunderstood by art critics in the process, the art funding in Britain, the art world as a 'very middle class place', Jordan aka Katie Price, the annual "wanker of the year" contest, making art without making products, his meeting with Andy Warhol, his dealings with the 'image controlling' music industry while filming his documentary about the fans of Depeche Mode, bats eating moths, Acid Brass, etc. My favourite moment was when Deller talks about a project he had of making a poster for the Labour party that would say "Vote Conservative" and show the face of Rupert Murdoch.

Jeremy Deller: Social Surrealism! Best 45 minutes i've spent this year.

Now i hadn't held an audio CD in my hands for ages. it did feel weird and already retro. It does however have advantages over an MP3 file: the CD comes in a hard paper that you can keep as if it were a book on your library shelf. And there's always the possibility to transfer the files on your MP3 player if you wish.

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Jeremy Deller, Procession, 2009. Manchester International Festival. Photo by Ruth Clark

Just because i love that work so much, i'm going to end with a video of Jeremy Deller talking about Acid Brass, the raves, the connections with 1987 minors strike, and taking a trip to Manchester where we witness the brass band getting to grips to a musical genre they are not used to play.

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Jeremy Deller, The History of the World 1998

Another work i discovered at the GAMERZ festival in Aix en Provence a few days ago. And just like yesterday's this one give sound a visual presence. So visual actually that artist Cécile Babiole defines her work as a 'sound sculpture.'

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Cécile Babiole, Bzzz! The sound of electricity, 2012. Photo : Luce Moreau - for M2F Créations

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Cécile Babiole, Bzzz! The sound of electricity, 2012. Photo : Luce Moreau - for M2F Créations

Bzzz! The sound of electricity brings us back to the pre-digital sound, to a time when electric energy was so raw and new, that it buzzed, sparkled and vibrated. The work renders the sound of electricity audible and spread it over the ambient space. Six frequency generators comprising basic electronic components allow the electrical current to be modulated so as to generate slightly amplified sound vibrations.

The soundscape is best experience when walking inside the sculpture, going from one sound to another, seeing how the cables and loudspeakers slightly vibrate as if the electrical current was waking them to an organic life. The sound wave generator itself is at the centre of the circular structure. It was amusing to see how male visitors felt entitled to turn the buttons to control the sound. I guess any artwork that uses electronics is now regarded as being automatically 'interactive.' But this piece wasn't. Cécile Babiole did however use Bzzz! as an instrument for a performance she gave during the opening of the festival

By reinventing an obsolete low-tech sound wave generator in this all-digital age, Bzzz ! serves as a commentary on the history of technology and a tribute to unprocessed, unsampled analog sound : in a word, the raw sound of electricity.

Video showing the installation in action, along with a short interview with the artist (in french):


GAMERZ 08 - Cécile Babiole di Festival-GAMERZ


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Cécile Babiole performing the 'Bzzz! The sound of electricity' sound sculpture at GAMERZ. Photo courtesy Benjamin Gaulon

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Cécile Babiole, Bzzz! The sound of electricity, 2012. Photo : Luce Moreau - for M2F Créations

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Cécile Babiole, Bzzz! The sound of electricity, 2012. Photo : Luce Moreau - for M2F Créations

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Cécile Babiole, Bzzz! The sound of electricity, 2012. Photo : Luce Moreau - for M2F Créations

Also at the last edition of GAMERZ: Macro-videos for musicians in action.

I got back yesterday from another edition of the Gamerz festival in Aix-en-Provence. I don't think there's a festival anywhere in the world i visit with more enthusiasm. First of all, it takes place in Aix-en-Provence which is always a bonus. But more importantly, the festival has a strong, unique personality. Gamerz, the organizers would tell you, is only a pretext to invite artists, designers, researchers whose work they admire. And they even have to do game art. The opening performance, for example, wasn't the compulsory electronic music performance, it was an astonishing concert given by Choeur Itineris, professional choir singers interpreting a repertoire of mobile phone ringtones. The rest of the festival programme involves robots, dipterous experiences, video art, food artists, a 'half ship, half woman' DJ and other surprising works. And game art too.

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Parc des Princes stadium, Paris (detail)

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Parc des Princes stadium, Paris (detail)

What makes the festival worth the trip for me is that Gamerz always manages to scout young, talented artists i had never heard about. Before i get back to you with a proper report, here's a brief entry about Geraud Soulhiol's extraordinary drawings. His Arena series portrays existing football stadium that are not only decaying and crumbling but have also been colonized by more traditional icons of architectures such as cathedrals, local monuments, skyscrapers designed by starchitects, fortresses, factories, etc. The feeling of desolation is increased by the fact that the hybrid structures are presented in the middle of an empty white page, like carcasses abandoned in the desert.

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Stamford Bridge stadium, London

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Stamford Bridge stadium, London (detail)

The images on this blog post are quite miserable but the large scale ones are spectacular and it takes a few minutes to uncover all the details.

What brings us back to the world of game art is that Geraud Soulhiol was inspired by the spirit and aesthetics of strategy video games, in particular the isometric perspective many of them adopt.

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Craven Cottage, London (detail)

This one is for Zoe:

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Emirates stadium, London (detail)

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Emirates stadium, London (detail)

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Camp Nou, Barcelona (detail)

Video interview of the artist (in french.)

Gamerz festival is free and is open throughout the city of Aix-en-Provence until Sunday, November 27 2011.

Felice Varini named the work he made for the Cardiff Bay "Three Ellispes for Three Locks" but everyone there calls it "The Barrage Circles."

Like most of Varini's works, this one is an anamorphosis, a distorted projection or perspective requiring you to occupy a precise vantage point to reconstitute the image. Think of the skull in Hans Holbein painting, The Ambassadors, the most famous example of anamorphic perspective in art.

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Felice Varini, Three Ellispes for Three Locks, 2007

You need to stand at a precise point to be able to the three bright yellow ellipses that have been painted onto the working locks, on the ground, the gates, the outer sea wall, etc. The interesting thing is that i had to ask my way to passersby and most of them had passed by the artwork without ever realizing that the splashes of yellow paint they had seen while walking the dogs or cycling to the other end of the bay could form three perfect ellipses. Most of them told me "There's some yellow stuff over there but it looks nothing like that image you have on your guide, love!" But it does. You just have to be patient and find the ideal spot to see the ellipses form. My photo camera didn't agree much though:

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But other flickr users got it right on their photos.

From really up-close it looks nothing like circles:

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I wouldn't recommend walking to the Barrage Circles. I did it, it's ridiculously long when you're not geared for a long walk by the sea. Take the water taxi, it's charming. Or even better, hire a bike.

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The rest of Cardiff's dockland district is all family fun with exhibition spaces, cafes, a Norwegian church but i only had eyes for the carousel with the horses and the red dragons.

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And then there is this Pink Hut on the eastern breakwater, originally designed for use by local yacht clubs.

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Photo by Robin Drayton

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More images on BBC.
Image on the homepage by Walt Jabsco.
And here's the link to Visit Wales, not because i'm a fan of facebook )certainly not!) but because it's a campaign for the Welsh Tourist Board that made my visit to Cardiff possible.

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Marina De Caro, 4 Ojos, 2008

Yesterday i was going through the press images of the 11th Biennale de Lyon which will open on September 15 and stumbled upon a work by Marina De Caro. I know nothing about it, except what Frieze magazine writes: Marina de Caro's work 4 Ojos (4 Eyes, 2007) is a video that portrays the artist wandering through Buenos Aires as a comical yet oddly poignant two-headed being. This four-eyed creature purports to have two consciousnesses, owing to the fact that its second head, which exhibits the will of a helium balloon, floats any which way it pleases while tethered to its twin only by a lengthy, limber neck.

That's it, now i just want to see the video.
I also think i looks like her.

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Marina De Caro, 4 Ojos, 2008

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Marina De Caro, 4 Ojos, 2008

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Marina De Caro, 4 Ojos, 2008

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Marina De Caro, 4 Ojos, 2008

More images in the project flickr set.

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